Inhaled Poison

 

A strange vaping-related respiratory illness is sweeping the United States, afflicting more than 800 patients and killing at least 16. Officials still aren’t sure what’s causing “vape lung,” but theories range from the oils in vaping cartridges to fumes from the vaping devices themselves.

In an attempt to solve the mystery, a team of researchers from the Mayo Clinic analyzed samples of lung tissue taken from 17 vape lung sufferers, publishing the results of their analysis in The New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday.

What they saw when they looked at those samples is downright disturbing: injuries that looked like the ones suffered by people exposed to mustard gas and other poisons.

“All 17 of our cases show a pattern of injury in the lung that looks like a toxic chemical exposure, a toxic chemical fume exposure, or a chemical burn injury,” surgical pathologist Brandon T. Larsen told The New York Times.

“To be honest,” he continued, “they look like the kind of change you would expect to see in an unfortunate worker in an industrial accident where a big barrel of toxic chemicals spills, and that person is exposed to toxic fumes and there is a chemical burn in the airways.”

Larsen told the NYT that the researchers didn’t notice any oil buildup in the samples, meaning suspicions that vaping oils themselves cause vape lung might be unfounded.

Two of the patients whose lung samples the Mayo team analyzed have already died as a result of their lung damage. But according to Larsen, even patients who don’t succumb to the respiratory illness may face a lifetime of issues because of it.

“Based on the severity of injury we see, at least in some of these cases, I wouldn’t be surprised if we wind up with people down the road having chronic respiratory problems from this,” he told the NYT. “Some seem to recover. I don’t think we know what the long-term consequences will be.”

3 UFO Encounter videos are real

 

Close Encounters

Three U.S. military videos that show footage of “unidentified aerial phenomenon” are authentic, according to U.S. Navy statements obtained by The Black Vaulta blog dedicated to exposing government secrets.
“The Navy designates the objects contained in these videos as unidentified aerial phenomena,” Joseph Gradisher, official spokesperson for the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Warfare, told The Black Vault.

Star Power

The videos first revealed to the public back in 2017 by The New York Times and To The Stars Academy of Arts & Science, a UFO organization co-founded by former Blink-182 frontman Tom DeLonge.
To be clear, the new statement doesn’t mean the Navy is claiming aliens are real: “unidentified aerial phenomena” are simply just that — unidentified and unexplained; no little green men necessary.

“What The…”

One of the videos, dating back to 2004, shows a so-far unexplained object that “appeared suddenly at 80,000 feet, and then hurtled toward the sea, eventually stopping at 20,000 feet and hovering,” as The New York Times wrote in its 2017 report.
Another shows footage taken by a fighter jet in 2015 of an object that passes below at extremely high speeds. “What the […] is that thing?” one of the pilots asks in the video.

Black Box

The videos were also never meant to be seen by the public.
“The videos were never officially released to the general public by the DoD and should still be withheld,” Pentagon Spokesperson Susan Gough told The Black Vault earlier this year.

READ MORE: Video Shows U.S. Navy Run-in With UFO [Popular Mechanics]
More on UFOs: The U.S. Navy Will Start Taking UFO Sightings Much More Seriously

Navy pilots ufo encounters

 

Close Encounters

In an astonishing new story by The New York Times, Navy pilots detail their encounters with UFOs — “strange objects” that have “no visible engine or infrared exhaust plumes,” but could reach “30,000 feet and hypersonic speeds.”

“Wow, what is that, man?” an unnamed pilot said in a video recorded in early 2015 of what appears to be an object flying above the ocean. “Look at it fly!”

“Strange Stuff”

Two pilots spoke on the record to the Times, while three more gave details about their UFO encounters under condition of anonymity. The UFOs aren’t necessarily aliens — and are likely just unidentified terrestrial phenomena — but military officials aren’t sure what they are.

“People have seen strange stuff in military aircraft for decades,” Ryan Graves, a lieutenant and Navy pilot, told The Times. “We’re doing this very complex mission, to go from 30,000 feet, diving down. It would be a pretty big deal to have something up there.”

Unidentified Aircraft

The news comes after the U.S. Navy was found to be working on new guidelines for its personnel to report sightings and other encounters with “unidentified aircraft,” according to Politico — a sign that the Navy is taking UFO encounters more seriously.

The New York Times also uncovered a $22 million program in 2017 called the  Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program — or “Black Money” — that investigated reports of UFOs from 2007 until 2012.

READ MORE: ‘Wow, What Is That?’ Navy Pilots Report Unexplained Flying Objects [The New York Times]

More on UFOs: The U.S. Navy Will Start Taking UFO Sightings Much More Seriously