You can be a NASA Moon Astronaut

 

Taking Names

NASA is officially accepting applications for astronauts to travel to the Moon as part of its Artemis mission. You can send in your own application, if you think you have what it takes, between March 2 and 31.

“We’re celebrating our 20th year of continuous presence aboard the International Space Station in low-Earth orbit this year, and we’re on the verge of sending the first woman and next man to the Moon by 2024,” NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said in a statement.

Job Requirements

If you make the cut, you might soon be traveling to the International Space Station aboard a SpaceX Crew Dragon or Boeing Starliner spacecraft developed as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program.

Candidates will have to show proof of a master’s degree in a STEM field and “two years of related, progressively responsible professional experience, or at least 1,000 hours of pilot-in-command time in jet aircraft,” according to NASA.

Résumé Booster

In the longer term, NASA is hoping to send humans to the Moon’s surface using its Space Launch System and Orion spacecraft as soon as 2024. To get to Mars, you’ll have to wait until the mid-2030s.

“For the handful of highly talented women and men we will hire to join our diverse astronaut corps, it’s an incredible time in human spaceflight to be an astronaut,” he added.

READ MORE: Explorers Wanted: NASA to Hire More Artemis Generation Astronauts [NASA]
More on astronauts: NASA Astronaut Sets Space Record, Says She’ll Miss Microgravity

Epic Selfie In Space

 

Space Selfie

NASA astronaut Jessica Meir recently shared what might be one of the coolest selfies ever via her Twitter account.
Since September 2019, Meir has been a member of the International Space Station crew. In January, she ventured out of the ISS for a pair of spacewalks — and managed to snap a couple of out-of-this-world self-portraits, while floating in space.

Big Smile

According to Meir’s tweet, she used a Nikon D5 with a 28 millimeter lens in a protective case to capture both pictures.

One of the photos is done in traditional selfie style, with Meir pointing the camera directly at her smiling face while the Earth can be seen in the reflection of her helmet.

For the other photo, she snapped a pic of her reflection by using one of the ISS’s solar panels as an ad hoc mirror. In that one, the curve of the Earth can be seen behind Meir.



Fine, visor up this time – but at least the magnificent Earth still makes an appearance too. All (and other photos) made possible with a Nikon D5 with a 28 mm lens in a protective housing (visible in center of 2nd photo). SelfieSunday

Still Badass

Meir isn’t the first astronaut to take a space selfie. That would be Buzz Aldrin, who snapped his own photo while spacewalking outside the Gemini 12 mission in 1966.

More than 50 years may have passed since Aldrin took that iconic photo — but it’s still hard to imagine a more badass setting for a selfie than space.

Read More: 
NASA Astronaut Jessica Meir Took a Space Selfie, Capturing her Reflection in the Space Station [Universe Today]

More on Meir:
Piece of Astronaut’s Spacesuit Falls off During Spacewalk