The End of The World as we know it

 

Growing Divide

As jobs are automated out of existence, the division between the very wealthy and the very poor will grow — and any notion of a comfortable middle class will vanish.
That’s according to Roey Tzezana, a future studies researcher at Israel’s Tel Aviv University, according to Haaretz. That stands in contrast to the common argument that new jobs will emerge as others vanish, painting a grim picture for the workforce and global economy.

Survival Wages

Tzezana argues that the jobs that tend to survive automation are lower-paying, according to Haaretz, meaning that as companies generate increased wealth, almost none of it ends up in the pockets of workers. Instead, more people are stuck living paycheck to paycheck, even if unemployment rates are technically low.
“This figure is the end of the world for the average people,” Tzezana said, speaking about the growing gap between labor productivity and wages. “It reflects a rather depressing picture: The state and the economy are advancing by storm — but the workers are almost not benefitting from this progress and are left behind. It is almost a catastrophe.”
The end result? A society defined by pockets of extreme wealth but otherwise dominated by people who barely have enough to get by.

READ MORE: Futurist Sees ‘The End of the World as We Know It for Average Person’ [Haaretz]
More on automation: Globally, Most Workers Think Robots Couldn’t Handle Their Jobs

White House Cybersecurity Director

 

See Ya

The White House’s cybersecurity team is in a state of turmoil.

In an internal memo obtained by Axios, senior White House cybersecurity director Dimitrios Vastakis detailed his frustration with how the Trump administration has managed a mission established to protect the White House from digital security threats — and then submitted his resignation.

Real Subtle

The Obama administration established the Office of the Chief Information Security Officer (OCISO) in 2014 after it discovered evidence that Russia had breached White House computers. In July, the Trump administration folded OCISO into the Office of the Chief Information Officer.

Since then, leadership has attempted to remove the remaining OCISO staff by “reducing the scope of duties, reducing access to programs, revoking access to buildings, and revoking positions with strategic and tactical decision making authorities,” Vastakis wrote in his memo.

Chaos Reigns

To date, at least a dozen OCISO officials have either resigned from or been pushed out, and all that chaos has Vastakis concerned about the future security of White House data.

“Unfortunately, given all of the changes I’ve seen in the past three months,” he wrote, “I foresee the White House is posturing itself to be electronically compromised once again.”

And Vastakis isn’t going to be around to watch it happen.

READ MORE: Scoop: Cyber memo warns of new risks to White House network [Axios]
More on cybersecurity: Congressman: The 2020 Election Is Not Safe From Hackers

The 5 Core Principles of Journalism

 

The 5 Core Principles of Journalism

1. Truth & Accuracy
2. Independence
3. Fairness & Impartiality
4. Humanity
5. Accountability

“This used to be the standards of journalism.”

Ghost post!

 

Ghost post! Google creates world’s most powerful computer, NASA ‘accidentally reveals’ …and then publication vanishes

Google’s new Quantum Computer reportedly spends mere minutes on the tasks the world’s top supercomputers would need several millennia to perform. The media found out about this after NASA “accidentally” shared the firm’s research.

The software engineers at Google have built the world’s most powerful computer, the Financial Times and Fortune magazine reported on Friday, citing the company’s now-removed research paper. The paper is said to have been posted on a website hosted by NASA, which partners with Google, but later quietly taken down, without explanation.

Google and NASA have refused to comment on the matter. A source within the IT giant, however, told Fortune that NASA had “accidentally” published the paper before its team could verify its findings….

Cell phone

 

Home is where the heart is, but today, the phone is where the heart is…


Cell phone dependency is now called compulsive communicating.
Chain dialers call continually to get another fix…

Cell phones, mobile e-mail, and all the other cool and slick gadgets can
cause massive losses in our creative output and overall productivity…

Cell phone radiation changes the shape of brain proteins, causing them to clump together and form pathological protein fibrils like those found in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease patients… 

Scanning His Face Without Consent

 

Court Case

For the first time, police in the U.K. are going to have to defend their use of facial recognition tech in court.
British office worker Ed Bridges is claiming that South Wales Police scanned his face at least twice without his permission. He believes these scans violated his human rights, an assertion he will present during a three-day court hearing that kicked off in Cardiff on Tuesday — and if the court agrees with Bridges, the ruling could profoundly alter future use of facial recognition tech by law enforcement.

Shopping Scans

Bridges says he first noticed police scanning his face while he was out shopping in Cardiff in December 2017.

“I popped out of the office to do a bit of Christmas shopping and on the main pedestrian shopping street in Cardiff, there was a police van,” Bridges told BBC News. “By the time I was close enough to see the words ‘automatic facial recognition’ on the van, I had already had my data captured by it.”

“That struck me as quite a fundamental invasion of my privacy,” he added.

Bridges says the second scan occurred while he was attending a peaceful anti-arms protest.

Setting A Precedent

With the support of human rights organization Liberty, Bridges launched a crowdfunding campaign to raise money to take the U.K. police to court.

“Facial recognition technology snatches our biometric data without our knowledge or consent, making a mockery of our right to privacy,” Liberty lawyer Megan Goulding said in a press release. “It is discriminatory and takes us another step towards being routinely monitored wherever we go, fundamentally altering our relationship with state powers and changing public spaces. It belongs to a police state and has no place on our streets.”

This is the U.K.’s first legal case on law enforcement’s use of facial recognition tech, so if the court agrees with Bridges and Liberty, it’ll set a precedent that could shape the future of the controversial technology throughout the nation — and possibly even beyond it.

READ MORE: Police facial recognition surveillance court case starts [BBC News]

More on facial recognition: Police Said You Could Skip Public Facial Recognition. They Lied.